Case study

Industry: Industrial plant owners with coal-fired power generation systems

ISSUE

Growing environmental awareness and emission regulations are making it more difficult to use coal-fired power equipment

Growing environmental awareness and the drive to cut CO₂ emissions are accelerating the transition away from coal. Many governments are demanding business owners to reduce or phase out the use of coal. The imposition of carbon taxes is an additional burden for such plant owners. Furthermore, as coal-fired plants reach their near of life point, these facilities face the problem of rising maintenance costs.

Balancing the conflicting needs of increasing production and complying with emissions regulations

To meet CO₂ reduction targets set by regions, many countries are compelling industrial plant owners to cut emissions. For this reason, plant owners may be unable to increase production levels unless they reduce the emissions of their existing production facilities.

Rising power purchasing prices urges plant owners to maximize and optimize their power generation systems

When a production facility consumes large quantities of electric power, the power generation system may not be sufficient to meet the demand. In this case, the shortfall has to be purchased from an electric power utility, thereby driving up the cost of production.

SOLUTION

KEY POINTS TO THE SOLUTION

  • Fuel conversion from coal to gas, to cut CO₂ emissions, tailored for existing facilities
  • Boosting power and steam supply while meeting CO₂ emission limits, to increase production
  • Larger amount of heat supply help to increase economic efficiency

Fuel conversion from coal to gas, to cut CO₂ emissions, tailored for existing facilities

Leveraging its rich experience in delivering gas turbine and steam power generation systems as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems, Mitsubishi Power is able to offer optimized solutions tailored for customers. In addition to optimizing new cogeneration plant, we can also assist customers with upgrading their existing facilities for heat optimization and power output.

Illustration of gas turbine power generation system and comparison graph of CO₂ emission
Illustration of gas turbine power generation system and comparison graph of CO₂ emission

Boosting power and steam supply while meeting CO₂ emission limits, to expand production

Example of fuel conversion solutions with a H-25 gas turbine.

Case 1: Remove coal-fired facilities with STG (Steam Turbine Generator) and install new GT (Gas Turbine) + HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generator) to cut purchased power by 1 MW and CO₂ emissions by 313,900 tons/year

Cogeneration with gas turbine case 1
Cogeneration with gas turbine case 1

Case 2: Remove coal-fired facilities and install new GT + HRSG, and optimize and retrofit part of existing facilities to reduce purchased power by 11 MW and CO₂ emissions by 264,000 tons/year

Cogeneration with gas turbine case 2
Cogeneration with gas turbine case 2

These proposals enable customers to reduce both CO₂ emissions and power purchases, while maintaining production.

Larger amount of heat supply help to increase economic efficiency

The exhaust gas of the H-25 is around 560°C —which is higher than other gas turbines of the same output range, and it enables to supply larger amount of steam compare with the other gas turbines. Conversion of power generation systems (to gas) can also boost electric power output from owned power plant, reducing the need to purchase power and lowering costs even further.

EXPECTED OUTCOME

  • Along with the reduction of CO₂ emissions, applying the H-25 gas turbine will help optimize the OPEX and efficiency for the plant.
  • Converting a power generation facility from a coal-fired to gas fired using gas turbine generators with similar class of output can halve CO₂ emissions. In case of applying H-25 gas turbine, the plant emissions will be reduced by 300,000 tons/year.)
GTG (Gas Turbine Generator)
GTG (Gas Turbine Generator)

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